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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got
for detroit. 20 10 air cargo threat as well as other plots that were effectively mitigated. some more international in scope and origin like the christmas they plot was involved a nigerian citizen who purchased his ticket in ghama,. flew from legos to amsterdam and attended to ignite a bomb en route to america. that attempted attack, we learned that relevant information possessed by u.s. customs and border protection needed to be available overseas at the last point of departure for the united states. we fixed that. we learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
is focusing on detroit. a city that is gone through incredible pain. and this is an opportunity for those of us who believe this is the greatest country in the world for people to have the opportunity to become all that they can be. we can go to detroit and it's a city where we which party has run that city for the past 50 years and we can propose different solutions, solutions . sed on our free enterprise strongly encouraging enterprise zones in detroit but we need ideas. anyone want to talk to us about detroit, that's where we think is one of the most important places to have an impact and to share in the cause that each of us believe. it's an honor to be with you all to share some words. i appreciate the opportunity. and god bless you. god bless america. thank you. >> thank you. now we will hear from mr. bob woodson sr., founder and president for the center of america.integrated >> good afternoon. the dr. king i remember was a man who was not content with reflecting the majority opinion or the consensus of the majority but he challenged it. we forget that the civil rights movement was
elements. if you look at his speeches from birmingham, wrik wrigly field, cleveland, chicago, detroit, i have a dream and the march on washington is really a culminationef a series of interracial fest valz that summer in which all the elements, many from letters from a birmingham jail-- are reshuffled. when you see the continuities of "i have a dream" even the drea dream-- and king always believed before there was an american dream-- he used to preach this all the time it's slaves had their own dreams. and keep in mind here, doesn't end with the declaration. it's a black man. black slaefs have the last word when he has whites become blacks so we can all experience bondage and deliverance. always conflicted when you look at king's brilliant mixing to miss these other strains of black pride and rebeaut of america. one day, the national will live out, not now. >> rose: clawrns, how did he end up being the last speaker? >> there was a proposal, 10 speers, and each speaker would be allocated five minute. and the proposal was dr. king would be in the middle, that he would be like the fifth or
of detroit of their pensions. they worked hard for these pensions. [applause] and let me tell you something, if they, if we stand by while they take the detroiters pensions, they'll be taking our pensions. so don't think it won't happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they'll do it to us again. you know, let me just tell you this: inequality is a scourge on our society. and, yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour, we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979 and 2007, 20, you know, a period of a it little bit less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we have got to fight back at this. let me tell you this, our economy is capable be of producing -- capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas that just leaned on us if a few mon
of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hungering for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't historically black colleges and universities desperate for stability be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these? as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the great depression, america needs a new marshall plan for our cities to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's exhortation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace
't have to look any more at greece and portugal. we can look close by at detroit . folks, that is a picture of where liberal progressive ideas go. detroit was america's premier city. highest per capita income in the country. proud of our country and the auto business there. but then as you had government unions grow and higher taxes, and more regulation, as you saw these liberal progressive ideas that were supposed to help the poor and build a middle class, what have we been left with in detroit? for minorities and the poor? unemployment, about 40%. has it helped children get a better education? only 7% of children in the eighth grade read at the grade level. has it created the prosperity that they talk about when a third of the buildings are empty, where you've got 400ly quor stores and until a few weeks ago not one chain super market in what was america's premier city. folks, it's not a theatrical argument any more. and the states of california and illinois and other states following that policy are not far behind in some form of bankruptcy. our ideas are being show cas
you think martin luther king would be saying about what has unfolded in detroit? >> well, i think obviously he would be very concerned. he would be outraged today that in america, black youth unemployment is close to 40% and real unemployment in this country is 14%. he talked about and led and moved toward that march on washington, that poor people's march at the time that he died, what he was talking about is an economy of full employment. massive investment in job creation and not just for african-americans. he was bringing together hispanics, poor whites and he was saying we have got to stand together and too often, ed, we forget about that aspect about martin luther king jr. and we simply focus on his enormously effective work in desegregating america. >> that day, what was the mood like? if you have to capture the emotion and memory about what that day was like, what would you say? >> enormous optimism, enormous excitement about the fact that so many people of all colors, of all ages came together in washington, d.c. that was unprecedented up until that point. the king speech
are bailed out. detroit is in bankruptcy. we're paying an awful price for the intervention in iraq. said it leads to a moral and spiritual bankruptcy. when he was killed, the values and standards went up. of theeaming constitutional right to vote. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. choose schools over gills. keep dreaming of student loan forgiveness. keep dreaming. to restoreng foreclosed housing. keep dreaming of immigration reform that includes africa, haiti, and the caribbean. keep dreaming. we're free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. graduations and los feliz. keep the faith. keep hope alive though. -- keep hope alive. the lord is our life. >> ♪ >> our next speaker is is an attorney, president of the national bar association, president of the washington bar christiann, and the product company. >> we must stand an hour ground for justice. we must stand our ground for justice. on behalf of the national bar association, the nation's oldest and largest bar association of attorneys of color, founded in 1925, i am honored to be here today. for the last 88 years,
and extracted that phrase and first used it in the detroit speech and then the speech in washington. >> i think one of the things to remember about dr. king, he was always operating on multiple levels in the context of the speech. he had just visited the university of virginia, only about three months before the march on washington 15 years ago where he was given a very academic speech and really spoke from the professor voice and academic voice about philosophy. remember, the university of virginia is mr. jefferson's university. it is the president, the founder who wrote that bad check, who wrote of course that extraordinary founding document that said we take it as self evident that all people are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights and if if there was any self evidence on the mountain in 1776 than the fundamental human equality and so we see in king drawing on his ak sem i can self and a moment of african-american american woman dom preacher dom and the great historic document. >> we talk about the historic speeches and you can see tens of thousands get
. detroit birmingham bankruptcy. we're still paying an awful price for iraq. too much war, too little social uplift. ratings as killed, his went down. his status went up. so keep dreaming of the constitutional right to vote, stop the madness in north carolina and texas. keep dreaming. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. to go from sovereign thrift to sovereign employ, education, housed, choose schools over jails. keep dreaming. student loan debt forgiveness. keep dreaming. revise the u.s. civil rights commission. keep dreaming. restore foreclosed housing. keep dreaming. immigration reform that includes africa, haiti and the cribions. keep dreaming. 50 years later we are free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. and more graduation. and so keep the faith. and through it all keep lives. the lord is our light. >> our next speaker is attorney patricia rhodes, president national bar association, president of the washington bar association, legal funding, and the christian product company. >> we must stand our grounds for justice. we must stand our grounds for justice. on beha
. homeowners are locked up. insurance companies are bailed out. detroit is in bankruptcy. we're paying an awful price for he intervention in iraq. he said it leads to a moral and piritual bankruptcy. when he was killed, the values and standards went up. keep dreaming of the constitutional right to ote. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. choose schools over jails. keep dreaming of student loan forgiveness. keep dreaming. keep dreaming to restore foreclosed housing. keep dreaming of immigration reform that includes africa, haiti, and the caribbean. keep dreaming. we're free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. more graduations and less funerals. keep the faith. keep hope alive. he lord is our life. ♪ ♪ >> our next speaker is an attorney, president of the national bar association, president of the washington bar association, and the christian product company. >> we must stand our ground for justice. we must stand our ground for justice. on behalf of the national bar association, the nation's oldest and largest bar association of attorneys of color, founded in 1925, i am h
mother understood that we lived in the north in detroit michigan, where i live now. she and i knew, from reading different obligations, like jet , about newspaper different disturbances in the south. remember seeing the picture of major adverse, after he had been killed -- medger evers after he had been killed. i went to integrated schools and lived in a integrated neighborhood. my friends were white and black, all through school. it disturbs my mother and me that people in the south had problems and could not live the life that i lived. they went to lunch counters and took public transportation. we would get on the bus. ride wherever we need to go and sat wherever we want to set. -- sit. coming to the march meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. just my mother and i. 250,000 people felt the same way. many who watched from their tvs and homes. it felt the same way and could not get there. thatew and understood america is a democracy and they're supposed to be freedom. there is not freedom. we have to unite and stand together as a child, i was 12 .ears old you c
a disproportionate impact on young in this country. i came back from a gathering in detroit, young people who are retail, fast food workers, who are demanding the minimum wage be lept forward to catch up with inflation because it's fall een woefully behind. these young people they see themselves as having absolutely nothing to lose in this economy. they're barely hanging on to the edge, working for $7.25. at rooms like rainbow, black, latino, white, asian, i'm sure there were native people in the room as well. the reality is they saw themselves as being on the same team. that team is people who in this economy, despite their brilliance, despite clear leadership potential h been relegated to margin and forced to survive on $7.25, which is something you can't do. i do believe this rising generation, more some than others because they're less tripped up on race, are willing to work together based on the common interest of kitchen table issues. you're seeing it with older people, too. we saw it with white union workers in 2012 throughout the midwest, for instance. so, i think there's reasons to b
detroit, michigan, which is where i live now, but she knew and i knew from reading different publications like "jet." our black newspaper was then called "the michigan chronicle." i remember vividly seeing the picture of mr. evers after he had been killed. but growing up in the north, in detroit, i lived the dream that dr. king spoke of. i went to integrated schools. i lived in an integrated neighborhood. my friends were both white and black, all through school. it disturbed my mother and it disturbs me that people in the south had problems, they could not live the life that i lived. we dined at lunch counters and took public transportation in contrast to what you heard about rosa parks and others. we rode on the bus -- it was called the dsr then. and we would ride wherever we wanted to go and sit wherever we wanted to sit. coming to the march for us meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. and not just my mother and i, obviously. 250,000 people felt the same way. those that could get there. there were many who watched from their tv's at home that felt the same wa
to discussions in the black study center. paul kuntzler was born in detroit, michigan, in 1941 and raised at grosse pointe there before moving to washington, d.c. in 1951, he was active with the michigan young democrats and the congress on racial he called it. he credits john f. kinney as a major influence on his political consciousness. iin december 19 city with a move to washington, d.c. just days before his 20th birthday. he attended both the northern virginia center of the university of virginia and george mason university. for 32 years he was on the senior staff of the national science speakers association as assistant executive director for advertising exhibits an exhibitor workshops. in 1962, he was elected to the board of directors of the society of washington, the districts first gay-rights group. on april 17, 1965, he was one of 10 people in the world's first gay-rights picket in front of the white house. he is also one of the founders of the gay and lesbian activists alliance. he has an incredible memory are displayed by his tendency to recall events not just by the day but dow
, the stench of his blood was in the air. the big march in detroit, the week later. of course, the birmingham monday less than a month later. then kennedy. there was a season of tumultuous uprising in our country and a lot of bloodshed along the way and a lot of fear. >> and that issue of where the vines was coming from and who should fear the violence. i'll talk to you for a moment. i have something i would like us to listen to. on meet the press, roy wilkins being asked about the likelihood that it would be marchers who would riot. let's take a listen. >> mr. wilkins, there are a great many people, as i'm sure you know, that believe it would be impossible to bring more than 100,000 militant negroes into washington without incidence and possibly riot. >> i don't think there will be any rioting. i don't think a hundred thousand people, just assembling, is cause for apprehension about a riot. the city of washington has accommodated much larger crowds and nobody has talked up in advance the possibility of violence. >> so as you just pointed out, all of the violence up to this moment had been ag
momentarily. i am from detroit. i lost my parents at an early age. brother.raise a i was able to go to school and i graduated out of high school at 16. i was able to get an associates degree. i found work at a hospital. our kids need be education. month.be 54 next i have been sick all my life. my family came from tennessee. they always fought. >> vivian, what stood out today? what speech or comment? >> what did you say? >> diane black, ok? i am black, ok? they did not want us to take welfare. they taught us to be independent. you calling ine and sharing your story. to facebook, you can see a lot of the video on facebook. here is a comment. w bush and george w. bush declined to participate because they have health issues. george w. bush did release a statement earlier today that read -- the statement from former president george w. bush, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from unive
we created a rainy day fund. i bet detroit wishes we had done what we had done in those years. putting billions dollars aside. those are things i worked with the mayor on and i'm proud of. but i don't agree with the mayor on everything. two years ago when he wanted to lay off 4,100 school teachers, all of my democratic opponents, they opposed that, like i did, but i'm the person who got those layoffs stops, and more recently, when the mayor wanted to put in place a homeless policy that i think quite frankly was cruel, i stopped it from happening by going to court. so when i can agree and work with the mayor or anybody quite frankly, i'm going to do it. when i can't, i'm not going to. i think the idea of having a government where you have to agree all the time or never, we have a place like that. it's called washington. and nothing happens. >> kind of a boutique issue in new york with the carriage horses. overall, there's a group for everything. >> you have a carriage horse actually. >> yes, i do. anyhow, that's a different story. there's a group called quinn hates animals. so
, the epa, the irs, the justice department to go on and on and on. it's like they want us to be detroit. we didn't vote for him. he got no votes from the state, thank you, oklahoma. but we are paying for it. and he doesn't end run around everybody. what can we do to get oklahomans working, to get these things implemented without him sitting up there and saying, this is what you're going to do, instead of the people that own this country telling them? [applause] >> you know, i would kill you don't blame it all on obama because they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i expense them, and he did, too. he goes back to the thing we kind of started out with, is the federal government is out of control. but it's been predicted by all the historians that our republic will fail. so the question is how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we really base -- we embrace the things that made america great. as i said earlier i think we have to get in charge. i've been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a bi big difference. b
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)